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Good InfoGrown-ups are saying this 'Bluey' episode might be the best 8 minutes...

Grown-ups are saying this 'Bluey' episode might be the best 8 minutes of TV ever made



If you’re reading this article as an adult who keeps hearing people talk about “Bluey” and are wondering what all the fuss is about, hi there. I used to be you. I’d heard people recommend “Bluey” over and over, but I had no inclination to watch a children’s show after already paying my dues in that department. My youngest is a teenager. Why on Earth would I want to watch “Bluey?”

I was wrong. So very wrong. It took my teen checking it out and getting hooked for me to finally cave and watch a few episodes. Initial intrigue morphed into sheer delight, and now I’m a totally unapologetic “Bluey” evangelist.

And I’m not alone. More and more adults are falling for the family of Australian Blue Heeler dogs and comparing their favorite episodes. One fan favorite that comes up frequently is “Sleepytime.” Many adults find themselves in a puddle by the end of it. But why?


Blue does a lot of things beautifully, but one of them is creatively highlighting child development milestones. In “Sleepytime,” Bingo, the youngest, wants to “do a big girl sleep” and wake up in her own bed in the morning. The episode follows the family through the night, alternating between Bingo’s dream world and the “musical beds” happening in the real world.

Really, it’s a short tale about growing up, letting go in your own time, knowing Mom is always there even if you can’t see her and the reality of sleep in families with young children.

X user Justin Dubin, MD, a first-time “Bluey” watcher, shared his thoughts on “Sleepytime” after seeing that it was ranked as one of the best episodes of TV ever on IMDB.

“Good god, it’s perfect,” Dubin wrote. “Rarely do you see such a simple idea considered in such a complex and relatable way. In just 8 minutes it tackles parenthood, growing up, independence, and family dynamics- all with very little dialogue.”

While there’s much less dialogue in “Sleepytime” than there is in a normal “Bluey” episode, the music (Holst’s “Jupiter” from “The Planets”) creates a sense of magic as Bingo floats around in space, gravitating toward the warmth of her mother, getting help from her stuffed bunny, Floppy, and friends, and ultimately finding comfort without Mom. And all of that magic is interspersed with real life in which kids are asking for water, climbing into Mom and Dad’s bed, kicking in their sleep, sleepwalking, and more.

First of all, a kids’ show acknowledging that children end up in parents’ or siblings’ beds frequently is refreshing to see. So real. Second of all, the tenderness with which Bingo’s budding independence is handled is just lovely. People often praise “Bluey” as a show that depicts good parenting examples, and it does. But it does that while being real—there’s one episode where Chili, Bluey and Bingo’s mom, says, “I JUST NEED 20 MINUTES WHERE NO ONE COMES NEAR ME,” and moms everywhere felt it in their bones.

The beginning of the “Sleepytime” episode is shown at the beginning of this video on Bluey’s YouTube channel if you want a taste:

But to see more than the first couple of minutes, you’ll have to watch the entire episode on Disney + (Season 2, Episode 26). It honestly might be worth the subscription price for a month just to watch all the Bluey episodes.





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